Culture desk

Zoë's Dublin Diary: What to Do This Week

Wednesday, 18 November – Perspectives 2015: David Lynch Revisited, National Concert Hall, €42.50/€37.50, 8pm

Director, screenwriter, visual artist and transcendental meditation enthusiast David Lynch’s partnership with Angelo Badalamenti yielded some of the eeriest scores in existence. Last June, David Coulter premiered his re-imagining of Lynch’s most revered scores in the Barbican. This Wednesday sees his assembled troop – Stuart Staples of Tindersticks, Jehnny Beth of Savages, Mick Harvey (ex-Bad Seeds), Cibo Matto, Stealing Sheep, Sophia Brous and Kirin J. Callinan – giving a live homage to Lynch’s universe. More details here and here.

Thursday, 19 November – Dublin Art Book Fair, Temple Bar Gallery

The Dublin Art Book Fair (this year in collaboration with ID2015) launches on Wednesday with a book signing by Miriam Elia and a live set from Soil Creep, but Temple Bar Gallery will be a hive of creative goings-on until 22 November. On Thursday it will play host to a public lecture by Dr Linda King on identity in twentieth-century Ireland, 1815‘s photography magazine launch and the launch by New Dublin Press of Imagines, a collection of scores by Benjamin Dwyer, poems by Kimberly Campanello and viola performance by Garth Knox. A pop-up café by The Market Kitchen will run throughout the fair, with artwork by Miranda Blennerhassett and a selection of design from recent graduates. Check out the Facebook page here.

Friday, 20 November – Emer O Boyle & Meadhbh O’Connor: 2039, Artbox, 11 am to 5 pm

Artbox 2039, closing this Friday, explores the interactions between artists and scientists, and the parallels that tie the fields together, which in turn feed and influence each other. Emer O Boyle uses Cecilia Payne Gaposchkin’s PhD work on decoding the composition of the stars as her own starting point. On 14 February 1974, a stray asteroid orbiting Jupiter and Mars, 23 km in diameter and as old as our solar system, was observed and named: 2039 Payne Gaposchkin. More here.

Saturday, 21 November – Backstory #1: Donal Dineen & Stevi G, Sugar Club, 8pm

Hosted by the ever-affable Donal Dineen, Backstory is a new series of nights devoted to dancy tunes and original visuals. Cork DJ Stevie G is master of ceremonies for its baptism, and will be using the night to give his own take of the history of soul music, from 1930s West African boogie to modern-day beats. More here and tickets here.

Sunday, 22 November – Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses, Convention Centre,€55 to €105, 6pm

Listen! Do you remember the first glimpse of that breathtaking, open expanse of Hyrule field? Roaming the Lost Woods? That fecking owl? This four-movement symphony will feature music from Ocarina of Time, Windwaker, Twilight Princess, A Link to the Past and new music from the upcoming (eee) remake of the weirdest and most psychedelic of all the Zelda family, Majora’s Mask. There will not be a dry eye in the room. Facebook page here and tickets here.

Monday, 23 November – Macadam Stories, Irish Film Institute, €11.50, 7.50pm

Samuel Benchetrit’s idiosyncratic urban dramedy weaves together the stories of six dysfunctional characters in a housing project, connected by one broken-down elevator. Each life is slowly transformed as significant people enter their world: a depressed man, an actress at the end of her career, an American astronaut. Part of French Fest 2015. More here.

Tuesday, 24 November – Lightning Bolt, Button Factory, €18, 7.30pm

This will be a really solid occasion upon which to lose your mind. Lightning Bolt are a noise-rock duo comprised of Brian Chippendale on drums and vocals and Brian Gibson on guitar, and they give an incredible live performance. They’ve been delivering A+ anarchy for about two decades, and their first LP in five years, released this March, shows an even greater uncompromising intensity. More here.

Zoe Jellicoe portrait
Zoe Jellicoe

Zoë Jellicoe is co-founder of the Made It series. She tweets @geneva__diva

 

Comments

  1. Log in to leave a comment.

Advertisements

Dublin Inquirer is an independent reader-supported newspaper serving Ireland's capital.

Support our work by becoming a subscriber.

We use cookies to allow visitors to log in to our website and read our articles. We don't use any third-party cookies. By clicking 'I accept' or continuing to use this site, you consent to the use of cookies.

I accept